Understanding Black Americans

Check this out. What you will see is a piece on the importance of gaining a better understanding of the 13% of Americans who are black. You will also see the author observe that many brands and companies have not done a very good job in gaining this understanding, or even in trying to do so, and are increasingly being called out for their ignorance.  

This got me to thinking as usual. Three thoughts come to mind. First, having been actively involved in pharmaceutical marketing research for the last 40 (or more!!) years, I can’t recall ever being asked to conduct a study related to understanding Black Americans. That’s not a good thing.

Next thought. It is generally understood that in order to break down healthcare disparity, we need to do three things. First, we need to understand medical differences across segments of the population. For example, our gastroenterologist at Volunteers In Medicine on Hilton Head Island recently explained to our board that H. pylori is present in about 33% of Caucasians, 66% of African Americans and about 77% of Latinx patients. Given that 90% of our 10,000 patients are of color, that’s pretty important stuff for him, and for us, to know to ensure proper testing protocols for GI cases.

Second, and this is where marketing researchers come in, we need to understand the cultural differences alluded to in this article. Blacks’ hesitancy to get vaccinated for COVID, and the relationship of this reluctance to the Tuskegee experiment and numerous other situations in which Blacks were medically abused, has significant explanatory power if we take the time to understand such issues. 

And finally, mindful of the above, we need to find creative ways to actually deliver health care to the underserved. VIM is a clear example of such a delivery mechanism.

Bottom Line. Things are changing. Health care companies are mounting significant programs to reduce health care disparity. J&J’s “Race to Equity”, The Novartis “Beyond Words” program, etc.  AND.  The ThinkGen team is starting to research relevant issues. Like doing ethnographic research with “free clinics” to find out how they work, learn about their patient segments, etc. Such knowledge is clearly necessary to guide the disparity reduction programs that pharmaceutical companies are mounting.

Exciting new times!!!

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