In my On Doctors’ MindsSM research that tracks the adaptations that office-based physicians have made to the COVID-19 pandemic, I have been fascinated to learn about how quickly clinicians were able to adapt to telemedicine, and some of the hurdles they encountered going up the learning curve involved in using this new technology.

But check this out. What you will see is a discussion of whether it is ethical for a physician to limit the treatment of unvaccinated patients to telemedicine visits. Survey results revealed that 69% of doctors thought this was ethical given the risk such patients pose to medical staff. A medical ethicist weighing in on the same topic agreed, but put in the caveat that if a patient’s condition requires personal contact for good treatment, e.g., in the management of a movement disorder, it was incumbent upon the practitioner to either allow personal visits or refer the patient to an HCP that would provide such service.

Bottom Line. Think about it. The COVID-19 pandemic brought with it, among many other things, a slew of new and important ethical questions with which healthcare providers must wrestle daily. As with so many aspects of the pandemic, I am thinking that the results of these wrestling matches will substantially modify thinking in the field of medical ethics for years to come.

If not forever!

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