Check this out. What you will see is common sense as it applies to telehealth. Quite simply, the pandemic hastened the proliferation of telehealth platforms and of physicians ready, willing and able to use them. The fact that third-party payers, in many cases for the first time, compensated doctors for telehealth visits was a significant driving factor here. Just so, patients seeking safety and convenience stood ready to try telehealth visits during the pandemic.

BUT. Challenges in actually using the telehealth technology reduced patient satisfaction, as did confusion about treatment costs and lack of a “provider details.” Also, rather common sensical is the fact that telehealth is seen as being more satisfactory by the relatively well than by those in poorer health, who are looking for more support from their physician interactions. 

Bottom Line. All of these J.D. Power findings line up rather nicely with the results of my On Doctors’ MindsSM conversations, wherein doctors are telling me month after month that it is the less complicated, follow up patients, and those demanding special handling in terms of safety and convenience, who are now the only ones getting serviced through telehealth platforms. Especially for specialists, the loss of direct physical examination and patient relationship management inherent in telehealth visits causes most doctors to far prefer in-office patient visits. 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *