Check this out. Press the Eye On Health SurgiQuality button and watch a fascinating video with an interesting premise. More specifically, the point of the video is that when patients are told that they need surgery, they are “shocked”, “nervous”, “scared” and “they don’t know what questions to ask.” Sounds right. Follow through the video and scroll around the SurgiQuality site, and you will see a service designed to deal with all these issues.  A service that will gather all of the paperwork necessary to approach surgery intelligently, or even to pursue non-surgical options which might be recommended by other clinicians. Case materials will be distributed to multiple providers to determine, if a patient elects to proceed with surgery, the highest quality and most cost-effective provider to employ.

Bottom Line. This approach is a very different one from what usually happens in real life. When a patient is told she needs surgery, the usual response is to proceed with the surgeon who has made the diagnosis, and to assemble as much paperwork as necessary to get the procedure scheduled and paid for. 

Does the SurgiQuality approach appear to be more rational than this? Absolutely! But I have two questions. First, to what extent will patients actually seek out this service rather than simply relying on the surgeon who has made the diagnosis and who has at least the beginnings of a viable patient relationship? Second and perhaps even more importantly, to what extent will surgeons repeatedly review cases, offer opinions and make bids for surgeries that they know that they will most likely not wind up being compensated for in most cases? This “competition,” which is described by SurgiQuality as being healthy, might seem less so to a doctor who is asked repeatedly to spend precious time without the guarantee of remuneration.

This will be an interesting one to watch!

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