The Use of Engagement Customization and Personalization is Becoming Increasingly Important—in Fact Essential—in Pharmaceutical Marketing in 2022 and Beyond

Developed by Health Psychologist and ThinkGen Chief Innovation Officer Dr. Richard Vanderveer

The COVID-19 pandemic has served to speed up a trend that was already well underway in terms of the pharmaceutical industry’s promotion of its products to physicians. More specifically, the practice of a marketing team carefully developing a message for their product prior to launch, then relying on pharmaceutical sales representatives (PSRs) to deliver this message repeatedly to physicians, was increasingly being seen by doctors as being both grossly inefficient and annoying.

The coronavirus brought with it mandatory office lockdowns and pharmaceutical companies pulling their PSRs from the field, thus providing doctors with a multi-month opportunity to question their previously accepted habit of welcoming “reminder details” that took up their time while bringing them no new information.

The result? Over the past 18 months of conducting our ongoing On Doctors’ MindsSM (ODM) project, we have learned that physicians have replaced this old habit with new ones. And, rather than being the homogeneous habit of old, different doctors have developed a large variety of new and different habits in terms of their engagement with pharmaceutical companies.

As a result, numerous marketing research studies, as well as reports from leading consultancies dealing with this issue, have argued that “customization” and “personalization” of pharmaceutical companies’ promotional efforts directed at physicians are increasingly necessary. But how should the industry go about delivering on these requirements?

Over the coming months, the weekly series of Insight CapsulesSM drawn from ThinkGen’s ODM project will provide answers to these questions based on an understanding of the “psychology of engagement.” But first, a clarification of terminology:

Customization: In our work, this term refers to the recognition that different physicians have entirely different preferences as to how a pharmaceutical company should be “engaging” them. As will be developed in subsequent Insight CapsulesSM, there is not an infinite variety of such expectations, but rather a manageable set of preferences that can be characterized through Physician Engagement PersonasSM (PEP) Engagements must be customized for the PEP being addressed.

Individualization: Based on the findings of our ODM conversations with physicians, we have come to understand that this term has two important meanings. For a new product launch, for example, we need to understand where a physician with a particular PEP is along the Awareness, Interest, Trial, and Usage spectrum, and adjust our engagement offer accordingly. Also, the physician needs to see the message as being specifically produced for her. A personal email from the doctor’s PSR, as opposed to just an emailed “ad” for the product, is perceived as being of much greater value.

Omnichannel: In 2022, marketing teams have a large variety of media, both push and pull, that they can use to engage a physician. Once an engagement has been customized and individualized, the marketing team must select the most appropriate channel to employ for its delivery. In fact, the selection of a promotional channel can be an important part of the customization and individualization processes.

Subsequent Insight CapsulesSM will explore each of these concepts in far greater detail and provide physician guidance as to how each can be optimized. Meanwhile, for a taste of the types of insights we are gleaning from these conversations, watch this short video clip from one of our ODM conversations.

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