Sometimes! Check this out. What you will see is a post by our friend, The Country Doctor, who argues that such examinations are often conducted without a good reason.  and perfunctory. As evidence, he offers the successful journey that most physicians made into telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic, successfully treating patients without laying eyes or hands on them. 

BUT. The conversations I have been having with physicians for my ongoing On Doctors’ MindsSM project have clearly indicated to me that many of them feel otherwise. For them, telemedicine was a necessary, temporary adaptation to permit their practices to go on rather than being put under, in terms of both patient care and finances, by the coronavirus.  Now that offices have reopened to personal visits, telemedicine is being relegated to extremely limited use, if any. Doctors report that they need to observe their patients to get the full picture of what is going on. Specialists in fields from cardiology to neurology have specific evaluations that they want to make, and they have to be done in person.

But is the same thing true for PCPs in a “routine” office visit? A brief story. When my wife and I moved to Hilton Head Island almost a decade ago, we promptly joined the concierge practice of what we were told (and it is true!) was the best Internist in Beaufort County. On my wife’s first visit, the physician laid her hands on my wife’s throat and “felt something.” Scroll forward and her cancerous thyroid was summarily removed. A good “routine” physical exam? Damn straight!

Bottom Line. I get the Country Doctor’s point.  Sometimes physical exams look a lot like “going through the motions” for no reason whatsoever.  BUT. To catch the unanticipated, as well as to build patient relationships, they are probably about as far from obsolete as they could possibly be!!!

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